About your Search

20121112
20121120
STATION
CSPAN2 21
CSPAN 16
SFGTV2 11
CNNW 10
CNN 9
WHUT (Howard University Television) 9
MSNBCW 8
MSNBC 7
COM 5
FBC 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
WETA 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 167
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 167 (some duplicates have been removed)
interest in china and chinese religions. >> well i studied religion in temple university in philadelphia. and then went in to chinese history and my degree is in chinese history, modern, but also always interested in chinese thought and the classics. i went to taiwan in the years before it was possible for americans to go to the main land to study, i studied classical chinese and so the great writers, philosophers and thinkers at the time and then i ended up writing my dissertation about mao tse-tung, so very i'm much in the contemporary era. so i've kind of done a lot of things in taiwan to shanghai where i taught at east china normal university and later in hong kong, where i'm going again as a full writer. >> okay that's good. how long did it take you to get through grad school? >> that's right, i did it - it's a lot to absorb but i was - actually it was nixon's visit in 1972/73 that opened up in a sense china to the u.s. they saw it as opening china outward to the broader world and it intrigued me and i said this is going to be big and we need more people to know what's going on betw
the eastern religion, with the world but it goes deeper than that because when we think about culture in china, it is a such an old civilization. and this symbol, besides its implications specifically within the religion, talks about balance, and harmony, and unity. and these are aspects of the eastern, the east asian world; touched on those a bit with buddhism, we'll see buddhism is in the mix, but the sense of the oneness, the unity of all things. now, think for a moment religiously how different that is. we don't have what i would call ontological dualism, we don't have a situation here where the world is here, human life is here, we live in history, and god angels the forces of creation are apart from that. what if everything belonged to one system? we are moving along the line more on the line of a monist. how would you react, ethically, if you felt that you, though you might have a different position in this oneness, you were a part of it, truly a part, there is a part in a part thing you have been dealing with the whole semester? that's a part of the instinct, that move
. for "religion and ethics newsweekly," i'm lucky severson. >>> this week the movie "the life of pi" opens nationwide and we have a preview today from deborah potter, who spoke with the film's director and screen writer. pi is an indian boy who believes in hinduism, islam and christianity but whose faith in god is tested when he is shipwrecked and his only company is a man-eating tiger. >> reporter: on the surface, it's an adventure story about a boy who survives a shipwreck in a lifeboat, alone, except for a man- eating tiger. but at a deeper level, "life of pi" explores the meaning and endurance of faith -- an unusual theme for a hollywood movie that critics have called "dazzling" and "magical." for director ang lee, the experience of translating the best-selling novel to the screen required a leap of faith. >> it is a journey, as a test of the strength of our faith, of how firm we believe in it. i think that has to be the number one thing i took from the experience. >> reporter: in some ways, the story of young piscine patel, kwn as pi, fies belief from the start. the son of a zoo keepe
it is it associated with the religion or another school? >> non-secular and nonsectarian. what does it cost to go? >> i have no idea. i don't know the answer to that question either but i do know over time it began to open the story's not just the offspring of the middle east but regarded none of religion. the class's and religions and that's appeal. it sets its merit. >> how is it viewed in the middle east when i think those were two separate questions. that would provide suspicion on the part of the middle east when the school opened in the late 1860's who didn't have deep roots in the region, but rather quickly it became apparent to the middle easterners who were not just orthodox christians, but muslims and jews because this was the best place to get the best possible education and at the generation by 1900 had become what it remains to this day which is part of the middle east and what's magnificent about that is it is an all-inclusive institution founded by serving the interest of the people of the middle east regarding of background. and this is an example of the united states giving to th
, religions, cultures, everything you can think of. we do not want to lose that identity of our own history regardless of where our forefathers have come from. i want everybody to be proud to of the language of their forbearers, the religion, the history, the culture, and the arts. again, i do not want us to lose our identity and the community in this great nation. again, thank you very much to the members of the boards for this wonderful gift bestowed upon me, and let's go ahead to continue to hit the ball park -- hit the ball at the ballpark. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, we will bring up our founder to say a few last words. we would like to ask all of the previous speakers to come up for a photograph. it is the hard work of these board members -- without their hard work, none of this would happen. thank you to everyone. >> we would also like for the judicial officers in the audience to come up as well. if you are a sponsor, please come on up. we will ask the founder to speak a few words. ladies and gentlemen, we will start our cultural program after words. food
evangelical women this time? >> again, i think there was always the question of religion and no one wanted to state the obvious which is governor romney's religion being mormon and whether that would impact the vote and it seemed it did impact the vote this time. it's very unfortunate because i think, at the end, what we need in america would have been a president that could push our economy forward and do what we need to do do get out of the economic crisis we have been in. you know, really, it's unfortunate when 2 million less people voted this time. >> even in the swing state of virginia, you had less evangelicals come out as they did for mccain in 2008. 6% to 8% stayed at home. >> you would hope we could cross the race and religion barrier. >> but let me ask you this -- granted, i thought the republican field from the beginning was incredibly weak. >> absolutely. >> but i saw republicans, once romney got the nomination, partisans gathering around him and saying, oh, the mormon issue isn't going to matter. and it did matter. there are evangelicals who see mormons as a sect and not chris
of their place in the community, and yet at the same time see how they are keeping their religion which in this case is christianity vital but they are meeting the needs in the community. and that's what we are trying to get at looking at this religious ecology theme and why they're so successful. so, rev. lowe at tabor lutheran church. we're here with rev. lowe at the tabor lutheran church, with a lot of good friends here, also. let me ask rev. lowe, this is a lutheran church and you think about lutheranism and you think back to europe and you think about welsh, swedish, german congregations, but this is a dynamite black church how - tell me a little bit about that. >> well it's only dynamite because we understand first who we are. we are black first, we are christians second and we happen to have chosen lutheran as our denomination. and we don't get that mixed up, that's always in place. so, with that in place we can have a black church and still be lutheran too and still reach out to the community. >> tell us a little bit about how you affect the community. i mean there is stuff goin
there was such a little god, jesus, religion and was all political and was all paranoid. they're coming to get us and we have to get ready. i'm not sure that i observed the insight that it gave me but it sure made me understand more about the fear that is out there and often behind the vitriol that we experience and i often, you know when someone comes at me either directly or indirectly the way that i try to stay sympathetic to ask what are they afraid of and is their anything i can say that convinces them that there is no need to be afraid but this was a double dose and it really shook me and helped me understand a little bit better of what we were against. many of our enemies in this movement are in the business of ratcheting up people's anxiety often to make money or to work for a particular political party or candidate or for whatever reason, it seems to me that they are simply brilliant at ratcheting up the anxiety. this service was not anything about the comfort that comes from a loving god, it was all about what is going to happen and it ain't going to be pretty. so get ready. i think we need to
also add religion to the list with some significant firsts. the first buddhist senator, the only nontheist believing in the absence or rejection of god is in the house, and the first hindu and only unitarian universalist. joining me now is democratic congressman keith ellison of minnesota. representative, always good to see you here. >> thank you. glad to be on. >> you know, as many know you were the first muslim elected to congress yet islam in america goes back more than a century. >> yes. >> that could be said of many of the religions i was just mentioning here. why do you think this is the era that people like this are finally being elected? >> well, i think it is because people are participating, people are engaged in our democratic process. america is more open and tolerant than it ever has been in its history and i think that folks want to be part of this great american experiment. i mean, america started out great for religion. it said congress shall make no law establishing religion nor bridge the free exercise thereof. also it said there is no religious test to hold off
, this organized religion. he is not ready to, you know, get organized religion. he is fascinated by the concept that there is somebody called god-- which happens to us. it happened to me in childhood. i used to wait for the time when-- for the time of prayer i used to wait and i used to cry. you know, who is god? >> rose: this is where pi begins the journey. he were it is. this is our first scene. ♪ ♪ >> my name is pi. i have been in a shipwreck. i am on a lifeboat alone with a tiger. please send help. >> rose: what's happening in that scene? >> well, it's just like-- it's very hard to fin to define god. it is very hard to define what tiger is to pi. there are the obstacles of the beast. there's, you know, pi, the inner beast, the crouching tiger, so to speak, in him. so in the spiritual moment, in the hopelessness, his looking at his opponent, but at the same time, himself, the fearful tiger and also the truth of his own self, and this is the moment before he revealed himself to god, not religious god, but god in the abstract sense. as you can see, the water is like mirror. it's very refl
others through their religion? that was not her fate. what was the result? here's what happened. >> days later she did miscarry, became infected and died of blood poisoning. her husband described their last moments together: >> cenk: that's her husband, was and apparently she said before dying: >> cenk: of course that's not true there was plenty they could do but chose not to do it because they are bar barians. i don't care your religion and i don't want it forced on me. i don't believe in your religion and you have no business trying to run everybody else's lives and bodies because of what you think your religion said and that is true if you're catholic, protestant or muslim. they complain about the taliban and about sharia law and all these muslims across the world that want to impose their religion on others. that is exactly what these catholics are doing in ireland and here in the united states, as well, and not just catholics but evangelicals, as well. get our out of bodies. you want to talk about small government conservatives liars. they don't believe in small government at all. t
that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i
't -- >> jon: not a big hit. he was called an atheist a at a time. >> an atheist in religion and a fanatic in politics by alexander hamilton of whom jefferson responded after saying that they were daily pitted in the cabinet like two cocks constantly at each other. >> jon: sure. (laughter) that will happen in a cabinet. (laughter) >> pressing on -- >> jon: please. (laughter) am i soiling your pulitzer. (laughter) i'm getting a little tarnish on your pulitzer. >> please don't say "soil." (laughter) as a favor. >> jon: you give as good as you get there. >> as a favor, baby. and then skwrofr son responded by saying he declined to have his reputation slandered by a man for whom history from the moment history could stoop to notice him-- with hamilton, who was an illegitimate child-- had not only received his -- received him into the country but had heaped his honors on his head. and all that hamilton had done to repay for this was to issue a tissue of machinations against the liberty of the country. >> jon: wow! >> so it was fun. i know that we think -- >> the snaps that these guys delivered!
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded on the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestantism. by the 20th century, catholics and jews mayed an important role, the -- played an important role, even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which which posits that god has given or that law is given from god to the people, and it bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common law, but by the 20th century, both had nonetheless abandoned it. therefor, by the end of world war or ii when -- world war ii when europe unloaded its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. thus, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant rel
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded in the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestant. by the 20th century catholic, jewish but important role a culture 190000 so fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, ma, which causes the last given from god to defeat all in bubbles upward to the rulers. kids says the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to peer, my stands in stark opposition to every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law and which the law. germany and england had come them off for a while but by the 20 century, both have more or less abandoned it, germany more so than england. their further the end of world war ii, when europe unloaded, however unwillingly its colony, those colonies themselves to find and print process of the law. thus the first of pillars taken together means that a christian, protestant religion influence and shape everything about ameri
'm not religious. i'm spiritual. >> what's the difference? >> i don't believe in organized religion. >> because of jonestown? >> oh, yes. it has a lot to do with it. it has a lot to do with it. a friend asked me how do you have so much faith and you don't go to church? i said, let me tell you, it wasn't an easy journey to get here. >> tracy parks and her father have made the same journey. >> i do not follow anybody, you know, religion wise or anything. i believe in god on my own. >> i believe in god. i believe in christ. but i don't believe you have to attend a church to make it into the next world. >> vern gosney stands apart, literally. his body from neck to feet is tattooed with eastern religious symbols. >> they're gods and goddesses, mostly hindu. i would say i'm a pagan. a wiccan. a buddhist. >> rather than renounce religion, he has opened himself to much of everything. >> it's a very important part of my life. meditation, prayer, to whatever spark animates life. and i don't know what that is. >> tracy parks' prayer was to come back to guyana to the airport where her mother died to say fa
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
ordered they look into natives religion and psychological records and medical records to make the case for punishing the student and kick him out. hated was little upset to sell in protest he made a collage dish to be put on facebook no blood for oil, and once the stock was falling down on the job named it the zechariah parking dried j. and the president thought this would be his legacy. he was already looking for excuses to take him out. he flips the note to undo the door to say with the call why should it is proof he was a clear and present danger to the campus. [laughter] and if anybody really wants to think he was day threat to but they did not leave even was the threat. you do not slip a note under the door. [laughter] so that case opens the book. so what was spectacular is what i have got used to. i also talked at length about the university of delaware as one of the most invasive programs i have never seen. and to be on the right side of history they defend it to this day with mandatory programs to stand on one wall if you have this a bid and so security security, affirmative-ac
another mormon date, so there's lds singles.com. for christians the majority religion in the u.s., there's christian mingle. you probably have seen the commercials. even muslims are on the hunt for a date. muslima.com is one of the more popular sites. finding a partner of the same faith is important to many jewish-americans, so they use j date and the site talks about its results. >> different sides of the country. >> here we are madly in love with two kids later, and if it wasn't for j date, we never would have met. >> going on j-date led to this amazing life that i have. >> i knew by the second date. >> i know you heard a baby. you thought is that baby somewhere? yes, her name is willa. she's here with her parents, jason and melissa. they met on j-date, married last year, had the baby, willa. hello, willa. thank you for joining us this morning. both of you, thank you. tell us about the importance of finding a date -- good morning. about finding love and the importance of religion in finding that. >> i grew nup a very traditional jewish household, and it was very important to me to pass
president. he knew a lot about medicine, architecture and religion and sdins. he created the first swivel chair. he had racy affairs throughout his life. thomas jefferson, the art of power, he tells his story in luscious detail. since we couldn't book jefferson to talk to us because he's not among the living, we have the next best thing in the guest spots today, jon meachem. welcome. you how are you? >> thank you. i haven't seen schoolhouse rock in a long time. that's great. >> i watch it every day. listen, thomas jefferson and obama. lots of similarities. we've noted some. there's policy ideas, too, in there. what do you think that thomas jefferson -- -- deep-rooted anger. i didn't put the deep-rooted anger. we know how i feel about saying that about obama. what do you think that thomas jefferson could teach obama going into the second term? >> i think the main thing is you actually have to like or at least pretend you like other people in washington. i think that's the main one. every night when congress was in session, jefferson would have lawmakers down to dinner. he didn't mix partie
taboo like religion. it is like, if you are all together on showing who you are, you will be accepted, and people will refine everything normal. i remember one movie which was very beautiful, "chocolat," which shows one guy which is italian, and he goes to work in switzerland. he is not integrated at all. what does he do? he preaches his hair blond to be integrated, to look as if he was from switzerland. at a football game, he is looking with all the other men, and it is italy against switzerland. at one time, the italians win. i find it beautiful and emotional at the same time. he betrayed himself through that reaction, and at the same time, it was beautiful, but at the same time, it is sad that you have to change your color or to hide it. that you have to do something like that to deny even your origin. you have to be proud of your urgent and to show it. >> you are giving me a challenge and a challenge -- giving me a challenge and yourself a challenge. what about cult? that is not something to hide behind. it is so out there, and yet, it can be quite important part of your collectio
is about religion. big foot, yeti, it's often a punch line. people are incredibly skeptical. >> you get punched if you say a joke about stuff around me. >> reporter: like we said, that are really into bigfoot. never mind the fact that the only thing anyone knows for sure about the legendary beast is that it has been wildly successful at filling tabloids, being the subject of terrible b movies. and generally serving as an all-around punch line. >> about what height did you see these guys? >> they were up higher than your hand. >> that's a big boy. >> reporter: matt moneymaker and his team are real life bigfoot hunters. with every bit of cutting edge technology, night vision gear and sensors, they can get their hands on, the group travels the world investigating bigfoot sightings. why are people fascinated by bigfoot. >> well, first, it's more than one. it's not bigfoot, it's bigfoots. there's a misconception that we're looking for one thing. >> reporter: their adventures make up two and soon to be three seasons of the animal planet show, "finding bigfoot." why is there no good fee toe of
at this and say, what civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimney rock in southwest colorado. and it's over 8,000 feet. and you are up at the southern end ftd rocky mountains and there is this scarp of rock that rises up probably about a thousand feet out of a valley floor and right at the tip of this scarp there are two twin towers of rock. if you get to a certain place on top of this very narrow butte, you can see between these twin towers and there happens to be a great house built between these two towers and every 18.6 years when the moon goes into its northernmost point on the horizon, it rises between those two towers. i was there at the beginning of the last 18.6 year cycle and we stood up there, probably 20 of us, researchers, forest service people, all gathered at the same spot with cameras and huddled -- it was late december at 8,0
for organized religion in church property and land was expropriated wholesale. today, the czech republic was one of the last former soviet satellites where the church has still not received compensation. >> the father believes in god's grace period during his daily prayers, he also praised for the church in the czech republic. as a good christian, he knows one should never abandon hope for a miracle, but as a priest in the czech republic, he has. >> i believe in miracles. our father in heaven can do anything. when i look at the situation in the czech republic and the government, i don't see much of a chance. there is no miracle in sight. >> and merkel is needed soon in order to save the monastery -- a miracle is needed soon in order to save the monastery. the communists expropriated the churches holdings, nationalizing thousands of hectares of forest and land. the church could find itself to releasing that land and pay for much-needed reconstruction work. >> this is a great injustice. how would you feel if someone took something from you and then insulted you when you ask for it back? that is no
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 167 (some duplicates have been removed)